Barbara's Beat: Paula Deen isn't prejudice, she made a mistake in the 1960s, but she has proven herself since then

Monday, June 24, 2013

Paula Deen isn't prejudice, she made a mistake in the 1960s, but she has proven herself since then

Paula Deen photo


"Let any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her."

Jesus taught the members of His congregation that they were only in a position to condemn a sinner if they were without sin themselves. "He that is among you without sin, let him cast the first stone at her." In other words, 'judge not lest you be judged' - Matt. 7:1. So what would Jesus do?


People at the Food Network jumped the gun to fire Paula Deen. I'm not saying what she said was not wrong, I'm saying that since it happened in the 1960s it shouldn't be relevant to her present career. That includes with QVC, Smithfield and everyone else. She has more than proven herself not to be a prejudice person.

Excerpt of  Paula Deen's testimony:
Case 4:12-cv-00139-WTM-GRS Document 197-1 Filed 06/11/13 Page 22 of 149
Q
Okay. Have you ever used the N word

Paula Deen May 17, 2013
Lisa T. Jackson v. Paula Deen, et al.
critesintl.com TomCrites and Associates International, Inc.221 BILLIPS - DEEN2
A
Yes, of course.
Q
Okay. In what context?
A
Well, it was probably when a black man burst into the bank that I was working at and put a gun to my head.
Q
Okay. And what did you say?
A
Well, I don't remember, but the gun was dancing all around my temple.
Q
Okay.
A
I didn't -- I didn't feel real favorable toward him.
Q
Okay. Well, did you use the N word to him as he pointed a gun in your head at your face?
A
Absolutely not.
Q
Well, then, when did you use it?
A
Probably in telling my husband.
Q
Okay. Have you used it since then?
A
I'm sure I have, but it's been a very long time.
Q
Can you remember the context in which you have used the N word?
A
No.
Q
Has it occurred with sufficient frequency that you cannot recall all of the various context in which you've used it?
A
No, no.
Q
Well, then tell me the other context in which you've used the N word?
A
I don't know, maybe in repeating something that was said to me.
Q
Like a joke?
A
No, probably a conversation between blacks. I don't -- I don't know.
Q
Okay.
A
But that's just not a word that we use as time has gone on. Things have changed since the '60s in the south. And my children and my brother object to that word being used in any cruel or mean behavior.
Q
Okay.
A
As well as I do

The next part of testimony that is causing controversy concerns Paula's brother's wedding. 



Q
Okay. So was Lisa ever present when you13discussed with Brandon what kind of wedding you'd like to have?
A
I don't recall that. I recall -- I do recall, once again, in my bathroomat that house, and why we would have been in the bathroom, I was probably filming and changing clothes, that's the only reason why we would have been in that bathroom, they must have run out during my lunch break or something from filming, and I remember us talking about the meal. 

And I remember telling them about a restaurant that my husband and I had recently visited. And I'm wanting to think it was in Tennessee or North Carolina or somewhere, and it was so impressive. 

The whole entire wait staff was middle-aged black men, and they had on beautiful white jackets with a black bow tie. I mean, it was really impressive. And I remember saying I would love to have servers like that, I said, but I would be afraid that somebody would misinterpret.
Q
The media might misinterpret it?
A
Yes, or whomever --
Q
Okay.
A

-- is so shallow that they would read something to it.
Q
Were they dressed in white shorts and bow ties?
A
No, they were dressed in white jackets.
Q
White jackets?
A
Dinner jackets.
Q
And a bow tie?
A
And a bow tie and black trousers, and they were incredible.
Q
Okay. And you said something --
A
These were men that had made their living off of service and people in a restaurant. 
Q
Right.
A
It was -- I was so impressed.
Q
Okay. And they were all black men?
A
Yes. Professional servers and waiters.
Q
And when you described it to Miss Jackson, did you mention the race of -- well, you had to have mentioned the race of the servers --
A
Of course I would --
Q
-- because that's the part that --
A
-- because that's what we just experienced.
Q
Right. Do you know what word you used to identify their race?
A
I would have used just what I just told you.
Q
Black or African-American?
A
Black. I would use the word black.
Q
Okay.
A
I don't usually use African-Americans.
Q
Okay.
A
I try to go with whatever the black race is wanting to call themselves at each given time. I try to go along with that and remember that.
Q
Okay. So is there any reason that you could not have done something just like that but have people of different races?
A
Well, that's what made it. 
MR. FRANKLIN: Objection. 
MR. WITHERS: Object to form. BY MR. BILLIPS:
Q
You can answer.
A
That's what made it so impressive. These were professional. I'm not talking about somebody that's been a waiter for two weeks. I'm talking about these were professional middle-aged men, that probably made a very, very good living --
Q
Okay.
A
-- at this restaurant. They were trained. The -- it -- it was the whole picture, the setting of the restaurant, the servers, their professionalism.
Q
Is there any reason you couldn't have found middle-aged professional servers who were of different races?
A
Listen, it was not important enough to me to even fight, to reproduce what that restaurant had. I was just simply expressing an experience that my husband and I had, and I was so impressed. 
BY MR. BILLIPS:
Q
Did you describe it as a -- that that would be a true southern wedding, words to that effect?
A
I don't know.
Q
Do you recall using the words "really southern plantation wedding"?
A
Yes, I did say I would love for Bubba to experience a very southern style wedding, and we did that. We did that.
Q
Okay. You would love for him to experience a southern style plantation wedding?
A
Yes.
Q
That's what you said?
A
Well, something like that, yes. And --
Q
Okay. And is that when you went on to describe the experience you had had at the restaurant in question?
A
Well, I don't know. We were probably talking about the food or -- we would have been talking about something to do with service at the wedding, and --
Q
Okay. And it was just you and Brandon and Lisa Jackson?
A
I couldn't -- I couldn't tell you who all was in there because the only reason I would have -- they would have come to speak to me in my dressing room is because I was in between takes.
Q
Okay.
A
Changing clothes and getting hair and makeup --
Q
Okay.
A
-- prepped.
Q
Is there any possibility, in your mind, that you slipped and used the word "n*****"?
A
No, because that's not what these men were. They were professional black men doing a fabulous job.
Q
Why did that make it a -- if you would have had servers like that, why would that have made it a really southern plantation wedding?
Q
You can answer.
A
Well, it -- to me, of course I'm old but I ain't that old, I didn't live back in those days but I've seen pictures, and the pictures that I've seen, that restaurant represented a certain era in America.
Q
Okay.
A
And I was in the south when I went to this restaurant. It was located in the south.
Q
Okay. What era in America are you referring to?
A
Well, I don't know. After the Civil War, during the Civil War, before the Civil War.
Q
Right. Back in an era where there were16middle-aged black men waiting on white people.
A
Well, it was not only black men, it was black women.
Q
Sure. And before the Civil War --20before the Civil War, those black men and women who were waiting on white people were slaves, right?
A
Yes, I would say that they were slaves.
Q
Okay.
A
But I did not mean anything derogatory by saying I loved their look and their professionalism. 
Q
But you knew that if you did something like that, the media would pick up on it and have something to say?
A
I didn't -- no, not necess --
MR. FRANKLIN: Objection. Asked and answered.
BY MR. BILLIPS:
Q
Correct?
A
Not necessarily the media.
Q
Okay.
A
But people around us.
Q
Okay.
A
No, I knew the media was not covering Bubba's wedding.
Q
Okay.
A
But just people around. It just wasn't worth -- it just wasn't worth it.
Q
Okay.
A
If I could have brought the restaurant there I would have done that, but I could not afford to do that.
Q
What did you -- what do you mean, if you could have brought the restaurant there?
A
If I could have hired that restaurant to come here --
Q
Oh, that restaurant --
A
-- to cater it.
Q
-- I see.
A
Yes, I would have, but I couldn't afford.
Q
Okay. I thought you were talking about your own restaurant --
A
No.
Q
-- bring it out --
A
No.
Q
-- and it was like -- it just totally confused me.
A
No.  


Everyone who has questions or criticisms about this story should read the whole testimony as I have. It's only 149 pages. 

http://www.scribd.com/fullscreen/149334744?access_key=key-2e9rmg0n667d4kex609f&allow_share=true
 
Matt 7:2-5 
"For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged [if we judge with an evil heart, His judgment of us will reflect it; if we judge with honesty and justice, His judgment of us will reflect that, too], and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you [if we use extremes or exaggerations, His judgment of us will reflect it and judging with fairness and compassion will garner likewise in His judgment of us]. 

Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother's eye [point out his sins, "minor" in Jesus' example] and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye [our own sins, even and especially those we will not admit, magnified by our selective blindness]? How can you say to your brother, 'Let me take the speck out of your eye,' [tell him of his "minor" sins] when all the time there is a plank in your own eye [that there are greater or the same sins in our own lives which we do nothing about or think we are above]? 

We love you Paula Deen. As long as the Food Network and those connected to them condemn you, we will turn them off, tune them out, unlike and not follow them, because they are judging you unfairly. 


7 comments :

Diane Cooper said...

I, too, love Paula Deen, and will continue to support her. I am so very tired of the "speech" police. The woman made a mistake, for God's sake, and she apologized. Let it go, people! Forgive and go on. Smithfield, Food Network, and QVC sent a message today. I am no longer willing to support such narrow-mindedness. They will no longer get any of my business.

Denise Mathis said...

God forgives those who are truthful...he always gives us second chances. I am totally addicted to Food Network, but I will NOT watch it again. Since when is FN bigger than God who forgives? Gordon Ramsay's treatment of people & his language is despicable and no one has questioned his his treatment of people!!! Go Paula!!!! I love you and forgive you!!!

Beth Zimmerman said...

This is so sad. I hate the way we treat each other! Been in tears off and on all day because it has been so ugly on Facebook. =(

Anonymous said...

A friend of mine wrote a Facebook post very similar to your piece, expressing anger and frustration at the media treatment of Paula Deen. She challenged people to "do their homework" rather than formulate their impressions solely based on the "PC" crowd, etc. I was impressed, and took up her challenge by doing exactly what you've done - by downloading and reading the official record (including court filings). I'm curious... Did you also read the original complaint filed by Lisa Jackson, Deen Enterprise's response & the motions? What were your impressions of those documents? Forgetting the allegations against Paula Deen herself for a sec (and assuming the plaintiff intends to offer proof of the allegations described against the other employees) did you get the impression that their work environment was pretty normal? Did you feel like what was described would rise above what any reasonable person would regard as abusive, inappropriate, discriminatory, oppressive, etc? Like, if you worked there, would Bubba have been someone you avoided, befriended, ignored? If you were the General Manager, how would you have handled the situation (or the staff's complaints & concerns)? Did you feel like Paula's brother put her in a tough spot? Do you think she shows the signs of an enabler in the way ALANON describes? I guess I'm still curious about the facts of the case - maybe because I'm already familiar with Paula Deen, her bio, her show, etc. Just askin...

Anonymous said...

Denise might be interested to know that Gordon Ramsay has also been hit with a class action suit this month. Not a good month for celebrity chefs, huh?

Anonymous said...

Is there any possibility, in your mind, that you slipped and used the word "n*****"?
A
No, because that's not what these men were. They were professional black men doing a fabulous job.

THAT right there shows how prejudiced she is, because she is then saying OTHER BLACK MEN ARE N*****.

These businesses know what they are doing by distancing themselves from her. Soon the only fans she will still have are other bigots from the South.

Anonymous said...

What they have done to Paula Deen makes me want to THROW UP!!! I am sick of black people using the N word, but no other race can and if they do, they have hell to pay. What a double standard! Up until a couple of days ago, I didn't know any of this was going on about PD. I have dropped the companies that have shamed her. Why hasn't that black woman in North Carolina been fired for her "white males need not apply?" There's someone that needs to be shamed in my opinion.